HDMI and displayport

What sets HDMI and DisplayPort apart? Unraveling the Differences

HDMI and DisplayPort are the two major display connectors dominating the market today, as they have superseded older technologies such as DVI and VGA. They offer compatibility with nearly all popular display devices available. Both HDMI and DisplayPort represent newer video transmission standards, with HDMI first appearing in 2002 and DisplayPort following in 2006. Although they share a common objective of transmitting high-definition video to display appliances, there are significant differences between the two. Ultimately, whether you choose HDMI or DisplayPort will depend on your specific needs and preferences.

HDMI and displayport

DP (DisplayPort)

DisplayPort is a digital display interface developed by the Video Electronics Standards Association (VESA).

DisplayPort was created to be a universal replacement for separate PC display interfaces including LVDS, DVI, and VGA.

The interface is primarily used to connect a video source to a display device such as computer monitors, though it can also be used to transmit audio and other forms of data.

HDMI and displayport

DisplayPort looks similar to HDMI but is a connector more common on PCs than on TVs.

It still allows for high-definition video and (in many cases) audio, but its standards are a bit different. On modern monitors, you may find one of the following Displayport versions:

  • DisplayPort 1.2:

Supports up to 4K at 60Hz, some 1.2a ports may also support AMD’s FreeSync

  • DisplayPort 1.3:

Supports up to 4K at 120Hz or 8K at 30Hz

  • DisplayPort 1.4:

Supports up to 8K at 60Hz and HDR

  • DisplayPort 2.0:

Supports 16K with HDR at 60Hz and 10K without HDR at 80Hz

HDMI (High-Definition Multimedia Interface)

HDMI (High-Definition Multimedia Interface) is a compact audio/video interface for transferring uncompressed video data and compressed/uncompressed digital audio data from an HDMI-compliant device (“the source device”) to a compatible digital audio device, computer monitor, video projector, or digital television.

It is the de-facto standard connecting high-definition (HD) equipment, from HDTVs and personal computers to cameras, camcorders, tablets, Blu-ray players, gaming consoles, smartphones, media players, and just about any other device capable of sending or receiving an HD signal.

HDMI and displayport

There have been multiple versions of HDMI, each improving on the last. On modern monitors, you’ll find any combination of the following ports:

  • HDMI 1.4:

Supports up to 4K (4,096 by 2,160) at 24Hz, 4K (3,840 by 2,160) at 30Hz, or 1080p at 120Hz.

  • HDMI 2.0:

Supports up to 4K at 60Hz, and later versions (HDMI 2.0a and 2.0b) include support for HDR.

  • HDMI 2.1:

Supports up to 10K resolution at 120Hz, as well as improved HDR with dynamic metadata and enhanced Audio Return Channel (eARC) which allows sending Dolby Atmos and DTS:X audio from the display to a receiver. It also includes a variable refresh rate (VRR) like FreeSync in the standard, though there are plenty of HDMI 2.0 monitors that also support the feature.

Here is the Comparision chart between DP and HDMI:

DisplayPort HDMI
General Specification Hot pluggable, external, 20 pins for external connections and 30/20 pins for internal. Video, audio, and data signals. Hot pluggable, external, digital video and audio signal, 19 or 29 pins.
Type Digital audio/video/data connector Digital audio/video connector
Designer VESA, a large consortium of manufacturers (including Panasonic, Silicon Image, Sony, and Toshiba) HDMI Founders (Hitachi, Panasonic, Philips, Silicon Image, Sony, and Toshiba). Spec is now controlled by Silicon Image Subsidiary HDMI Licensing, LLC.
Produced 2006–present 2002–present
Audio signal Optional; 1–8 channels, 16 or 24-bit linear PCM; 32–192 kHz sampling rate; maximum bitrate 36,864 kbit/s (4,608 kB/s) LPCM, Dolby Digital, DTS, DVD-Audio, Dolby Digital Plus, Dolby TrueHD, DTS-HD High-Resolution Audio, DTS-HD Master Audio, MPCM, DSD, DST, Dolby Atmos, DTS:X
Introduction (from Wikipedia) DisplayPort is a digital display interface developed by the Video Electronics Standards Association (VESA). The interface is primarily used to connect a video source to a display device such as a computer monitor, though it can also be used to transmit HDMI is a compact audio/video interface for transferring uncompressed digital audio/video/data from an HDMI-compliant device (the source) to a compatible digital audio device, computer monitor, or video projector
Hot pluggable Yes Yes
Designed May 3rd, 2006 April 16th, 2002
External Yes Yes
Manufacturer Several, including Apple Microsoft HDMI Adopters (over 1,100 companies)
Pins 20 pins for external connectors on desktops, notebooks, graphics cards, monitors, etc, and 30/20 pins for internal connections between graphics engines and built-in flat panels. 19
Video signal Optional, maximum resolution limited by available bandwidth Maximum resolution limited by available bandwidth
Data signal Yes Yes
Bitrate 1.62, 2.7, 5.4, 8.1, or 20 Gbit/s data rate per lane; 1, 2, or 4 lanes; (effective total 5.184, 8.64, 17.28, 25.92, or 77.37 Gbit/s for 4-lane link); 2 or 720 Mbit/s (effectively 1 or 576 Mbit/s) for the auxiliary channel. Up to 48 Gbit/s, as of HDMI 2.1a
Protocol Micro-packet TMDS, Fixed Rate Link (FRL)
Capabilities Can stream up to Ultra HD (4k x 2k) at 60Hz Max resolution is 10k @ 120hz, HFR, VRR, DSC, QMS, QFT, ALLM, 48gbit/s
Licensing cost Royalty-free $10,000 per high-volume manufacturer plus $0.04 per device
Bandwidth 21.6 Gbit/s 10.2 Gbit/s
Stands For DisplayPort High-Definition Multimedia Interface
Signal through cables Digital Digital
Compatibility HDMI, DVI, and VGA with converters Compatible with DVI, VGA, and DisplayPort with converters.
Introduced by VESA HDMI Founders (Hitachi, Panasonic, Philips, Silicon Image, Sony, and Toshiba). Spec is now controlled by Silicon Image Subsidiary HDMI Licensing, LLC.
Width 16.10 mm (width) Type A (13.9 mm), Type C (10.42 mm), Type D (6.4 mm)
Height 4.76 mm (height) Type A (4.45 mm), Type C (2.42 mm), Type D (2.8 mm)
Color format support Y′CBCR 4:4:4, Y′CBCR 4:2:2, Y′CBCR 4:2:0, RGB, Y-Only Y′CBCR 4:4:4, Y′CBCR 4:2:2, Y′CBCR 4:2:0, RGB
Color depth support 16 bpc (48 bit/px), 12 bpc (36 bit/px), 10 bpc (30 bit/px), 8 bpc (24 bit/px), 6 bpc (18 bit/px) 16 bpc (48 bit/px), 12 bpc (36 bit/px), 10 bpc (30 bit/px), 8 bpc (24 bit/px)

Unmarked pictures come from Internet, and source:

diffen.com

uk.pcmag.com

Yes, they offer compatibility with nearly all popular display devices available.
No, although they share a common objective of transmitting high-definition video to display appliances, there are significant differences between the two.
HDMI (High-Definition Multimedia Interface) is a compact audio/video interface for transferring uncompressed video data and compressed/uncompressed digital audio data from an HDMI-compliant device (“the source device”) to a compatible digital audio device, computer monitor, video projector, or digital television.
HDMI and DisplayPort are the two major display connectors dominating the market today, as they have superseded older technologies such as DVI and VGA.
Ultimately, whether you choose HDMI or DisplayPort will depend on your specific needs and preferences.